Agi sam spring 2017 runway


1. I am not completely comfortable with the body I was born with. How will taking hormones affect other things, like taking birth control, or getting my period? Will I need to get a hysterectomy because of taking hormones?

2. I told my mom that I think I’m trans, but she thinks that it’s just a phrase. What if she’s right?  I really, really don’t want to come out and ask people to use my preferred name and pronouns, and then have it mean nothing. What if I decide that I’m not really a man?

3. Lately I’ve had this desire to be a girl. I know I’m not ready for spring agi sam spring 2017 runway a sex change, but I’m planning to grow out my hair and wear more girly-types of clothes. I’m not sure what my parents would make of it, but I can’t get this off of my mind. Should I go ahead with it?


Question:
1. I am not completely comfortable with the body I was born with. In particular, my feminine figure (pear shaped, hourglass) is really getting to me, and I really wish that I had the ability to grow facial hair. I’ve begun to consider HRT (hormone replacement therapy) to help me feel comfortable with my body, after I check with my therapist. But how will taking hormones affect other things, like taking birth control, or getting my period? Will I need to get a hysterectomy because of taking hormones?
Answer:

It’s great that you’re considering your options, and want to work out a plan that will help you get to the place where you want to be. It sounds like you have a very good idea of what you’re looking for, and what you hope to get out of hormone replacement therapy. That’s a great first step, because it’s really important to understand what could make you feel more like you.
Have you talked to your therapist about any of your questions, including any specific anxieties you’re having about some of these unknowns? A lot of the questions and issues you bring up can be really complicated, especially in terms of the deep and complex ways in which the physical and emotional aspects of all of this are tied together.
Have you found and/or talked to a trusted health provider yet? It sounds like you have a lot of very specific questions about how hormones might affect you physically, and about any unintended side effects HRT might cause. Everyone’s body is different, so a medical professional would be the best person to tell you about what you could expect from HRT, depending on what your dose is and what your personal needs are. If you haven’t yet found a health provider, one option you could try is a website called www.glbtnearme.org, which helps folks find LGBT resources and services in their area. Your therapist might also be able to recommend a trans-friendly physician in your area who can better answer your questions.
If you have been considering getting hormones from a non-professional source, or if consulting with a doctor is not an option for you, we would encourage you research trusted sources before putting anything into your body. Most medical professionals strongly advise against taking any kind of medication that isn’t prescribed because it can be very dangerous, especially since the source and quality of the drugs cannot be verified or regulated. Here are some resources that can give you more information about HRT and how to stay safe:
• http://www.imatyfa.org/
• http://transyouthsupportnetwork.org/
• http://www.ftmi.org/
• http://callen-lorde.org/our-services/sexual-health-clinic/transgender-health-services/
Remember, you don’t have to figure all of this out all at once. It can take time to figure out what is right for you and your body. You are not alone in this. There are lots of people going through various transitions and feeling a lot of similar feelings! We hope that you can talk to a doctor face-to-face and get your questions answered. In the meantime, you are always welcome to call the Trevor Lifeline, or chat with us on TrevorChat if you need help. If you aren’t already on TrevorSpace.org, we encourage you to check it out; this safe, secure social network site has over 100,000 LGBTQ members and their allies from around the world! Chances are, someone on TrevorSpace will have gone through something very similar.
Question:
2. I told my mom that I think I’m trans, but she thinks that it’s just a phrase. What if she’s right? I really, really don’t want to come out and ask people to use my preferred name and pronouns, and then have it mean nothing. What if I decide that I’m not really a man?
Answer:

First of all, it was a big step for you to tell your mom that you think you’re trans. Sometimes our parents and friends need some time to really absorb and understand what we’ve shared. Just like you had your own process for discovering your identity, they need to figure out how they feel, too. It sounds like some of the doubts your mom is expressing have started to creep into your own thinking around who you are, which can be difficult, especially if you value her opinion. For now, let’s focus on YOUR feelings and thoughts.
It sounds like you’re worried that you might not really be trans, or that one day you’ll change your mind about being a man. It can be really scary when you’re unsure of who we are, but don’t worry, you aren’t alone. The truth is that you’re never “stuck” with anything. We all make the best decision we can at the time, and as we go through life we can grow, change, and even change course. If you’re feeling very strongly about being a man, go with your instincts. You know yourself better than anyone else.
Coming out is a very personal decision and you don’t have to tell other people about being trans if you don’t want to. However, it also sounds like you’re worried about other people’s reactions and wonder if it’s worth it to ask them to use your preferred name and pronouns. We recommend checking out our “Coming Out As You” guide, which can help you weigh the pros and cons of coming out. There are sections that talk about finding support, preparing for how other people might react, and staying safe during your process.
If or when you do decide to come out as trans, you don’t have to do it all at once. It is totally up to you who, when, and how to come out, and it can even be a slow, step-by-step process. Regardless of what you decide to do, please know that you are never alone— the Trevor Lifeline will always be there to take your call if you ever need to talk: 1-866-488-7386
Question:
3. Lately I’ve had this desire to be a girl. I know I’m not ready for a sex change, but I’m planning to grow out my hair and wear more girly-types of clothes. I’m not sure what my parents would make of it, but I can’t get this off of my mind. Should I go ahead with it?
Answer:

If you feel safe and comfortable starting to express your gender in a new way, then that’s your decision – after all, you know you best! Taking small steps, like letting your hair grow longer, and wearing more feminine clothes can help you learn more about your own gender identity. If you love it, great! Then you can consider what other types of girl-ish stuff you might want to do or take on over time. If you decide you don’t love it, that’s also ok! It’s not hard to cut your hair again, or go back to wearing the clothes you wore before. At this point, since you’re not looking into any medical changes, no decision you make needs to be permanent. There are no laws about how girly or boyish anyone needs to be, regardless of what their body looks like, or what others might think they are supposed to do or look like.
You might want to think about how your classmates or teachers might react at school. Do you think you would put yourself in danger if you started expressing your gender differently? Are there LGBTQ-affirming student groups who can offer you support? These are just two questions you might want to consider before coming out at school.
As for your parents, have you mentioned these ideas to them before? Are you worried at all that changing your hair or clothes might put you into an unsafe situation with them? Or, do you think that they might find the change surprising? If you want a resource that will help you weigh the pros and cons of coming out to your parents, or at school, The Trevor Project has a great resource called “Coming Out As You” available at TheTrevorProject.org/YOU. Above all, it’s up to you and your comfort level – no one can make you come out if you’re not ready.
If you want some one-on-one help, you can always give the Trevor Lifeline a call—that’s what we’re there for! 1-866-488-7386

 

 


Источник: http://www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/trans-gender-identity


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Agi sam spring 2017 runway

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